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Assault is a crime that can lead to serious consequences, including jail time, hefty fines, or both. In Colorado, there are two main types of assault charges- simple and aggravated. While these crimes are similar in nature, they have some key differences that can significantly impact the severity of the charges and the consequences faced by the accused. In this blog post, we will explore the difference between simple and aggravated assault, provide examples of each, and discuss the consequences of being convicted of either one.

Simple Assault:

In Colorado, simple assault is a crime that involves intentionally, knowingly, or recklessly causing bodily injury to another person. It can also include making threats of violence or attempting to cause harm to someone with a deadly weapon. This type of assault is considered a misdemeanor and is punishable by up to 18 months of imprisonment, probation, and/or a fine of up to $5,000.

Examples of simple assault include:

– Punching or slapping someone

– Pushing or shoving someone

– Threatening to harm someone

– Using a weapon, such as a knife or gun, to threaten someone

Aggravated Assault:

Aggravated assault is a more serious crime than simple assault because it involves causing serious bodily injury or harm to another person. This crime may also include the use of a deadly weapon, such as a firearm or knife. Aggravated assault is considered a felony in Colorado and is punishable by up to 24 years in prison, probation, and/or a fine of up to $750,000.

Examples of aggravated assault include:

– Causing serious bodily harm, such as broken bones or permanent disfigurement

– Using a deadly weapon to cause harm or threaten someone

– Assaulting a police officer or firefighter

– Assaulting someone while committing another crime, such as robbery or burglary

Consequences Of Simple Assault:

If convicted of simple assault in Colorado, an individual may face several consequences, including:

– Up to 18 months in jail

– A fine of up to $5,000

– Probation

– Community service

– Restitution to the victim

– A criminal record that may impact future educational and employment opportunities

Consequences Of Aggravated Assault:

The consequences of being convicted of aggravated assault can be severe and life-altering. They may include:

– Up to 24 years in prison

– A fine of up to $750,000

– Probation

– Restitution to the victim

– A criminal record that may impact future educational and employment opportunities

– Loss of certain civil rights, such as the right to own a firearm or vote

At Geoff Heim, Attorney, LLC, we understand the serious nature of assault charges and the potential consequences that individuals face. We have extensive experience defending clients against both simple and aggravated assault charges, and we are committed to providing personalized legal representation to meet your unique needs. Our team of attorneys will work tirelessly to protect your rights, build a strong defense, and secure the best possible outcome for your case.

Assault is a serious crime that can result in significant legal and personal consequences. Understanding the difference between simple and aggravated assault can help you better navigate the legal system and make informed decisions about your defense. At Geoff Heim, Attorney, LLC, we are here to provide the support and guidance you need to protect your rights and fight the charges against you. Contact Colorado Springs criminal defense attorneys today to schedule a consultation at 719-636-8955 and learn more about how we can help with your assault case.

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Disclaimer: The information on this website is for general information purposes only. Nothing on this site should be taken as legal advice for any individual case or situation. This information is not intended to create, and receipt or viewing does not constitute an attorney-client relationship.